Games with a good "CATS" one-pager?

Hey all! It’s been a while since I’ve played with the Gauntlet, but I recall a tradition of going over “CATS” before each game: Content, Aim, Tone, Subject matter. I’m wondering if there are any games that have a good, thematic one-pager that contains something similar. Something that would both pique curiosity and interest but also set expectations.

Bonus points if it’s something that can communicate…

  • agenda, principles, and expectations for the players (and possibly for the GM)
  • topics to consider for lines & veils
  • topics to discuss regarding tone & theme

…and still be exciting and interesting and make we want to play the game, rather than coming across as, like, a parental warning.

I don’t really recall every seeing something quite like this for a game, but I feel like someone must have come up with this idea before.

Whatchya got?

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Not exactly what you are looking for but I quite like the one sentence description of the areas in Electric Bastionland in the very beginning of the book - although it is a bit misleading about the tone the author seems to be aiming for (which is much more whimsical than the intro implies). Sadly no bonus points but the intro definitely piqued my interest about the game.

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While I think it’s a bit of a mixed success in some areas, the playbook design of Fellowship does a lot to bake those questions into play, GM-side through the Overlord playbook of course, but also player-side through player agendas, which are largely there as a reminder of the story we want to tell.

PBTA, in general, tends to offer a CATS in its GM agendas, although some games, of course, make better use of them in that regard than others.

The setup of Microscope incorporates a lot of the question of a CATS discussion in the opening setup; the palette, the bookends, and the one-sentence pitch.

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The most explicitly I’ve seen this called out is Brindlewood Bay and Girl Underground. I think most games have a C.A.T.S. section really, it’s just not structured as such. Its usually “What is this game?” section at the front of the book. I think of C.A.T.S. as just a framework to call out that information early in the writing and early at the table.

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